PLOS Research Predicts Climate Change “Winners and Losers”: Slide Show

A glimpse out the window shows the effects of climate change on the weather – but how will the rising seas and fluctuating weather patterns impact plant and animal populations? Biologists and ecologists are racing against rapidly changing habitats and vanishing species to identify which are the most vulnerable and why. The sixteen articles in PLOS’ “Ecological Impacts of Climate Change Collection,” as well as the accompanying posts on the PLOS Blogs Network, point out many species whose life cycles have changed and are at risk of dying out. The articles also note a number of species that seem more adaptable to the changing temperatures, including a few that may stand to benefit. The slide show below provides a glimpse into the changing ecosystems, with its “winners and losers.”

Click on any image to enter the slide show. 

 

To read more:

  1. LaRue MA, Ainley DG, Swanson M, Dugger KM, Lyver PO, et al. (2013) Climate Change Winners: Receding Ice Fields Facilitate Colony Expansion and Altered Dynamics in an Adélie Penguin Metapopulation
  2. Foden WB, Butchart SHM, Stuart SN, Vié J-C, Akçakaya HR, et al. (2013) Identifying the World’s Most Climate Change Vulnerable Species: A Systematic Trait-Based Assessment of all Birds, Amphibians and Corals
  3. Ellwood ER, Temple SA, Primack RB, Bradley NL, Davis CC (2013) Record-Breaking Early Flowering in the Eastern United States
  4. Coffee Plants Don’t Like it Hot
  5. Climate Change Means Good Times for Microbial Hitchhikers
  6. Wilson S, Anderson EM, Wilson ASG, Bertram DF, Arcese P (2013) Citizen Science Reveals an Extensive Shift in the Winter Distribution of Migratory Western Grebes.
  7. Foden WB, Butchart SHM, Stuart SN, Vié J-C, Akçakaya HR, et al. (2013) Identifying the World’s Most Climate Change Vulnerable Species: A Systematic Trait-Based Assessment of all Birds, Amphibians and Corals
  8. Polar Bear Genome Reflects Climate Change
  9. Foden WB, Butchart SHM, Stuart SN, Vié J-C, Akçakaya HR, et al. (2013) Identifying the World’s Most Climate Change Vulnerable Species: A Systematic Trait-Based Assessment of all Birds, Amphibians and Corals 

Image credits:

  1. Penguins: winkyintheuk via flickr (http://www.flickr.com/photos/winkyintheuk/20927113/); Michael Van Woert via public domain (http://www.photolib.noaa.gov/htmls/corp2566.htm). 
  2. Frogs: Václav Gvoždík (http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Cardioglossa_leucomystax04.jpg); Brian Gratwicke via Fotopedia (http://www.fotopedia.com/items/flickr-7154392800)
  3. Highbush blueberry: Rob Hille (http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Vaccinium_corymbosum.R.H_(2).jpg)
  4. Coffee: Forest & Kim Starr (http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Starr_070617-7324_Coffea_arabica.jpg)
  5. Mosquito: James Gathany, CDC (http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:CDC-Gathany-Aedes-albopictus-1.jpg)
  6. Grebe: Linda Tanner (http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Aechmophorus_occidentalis_-California-8.jpg)
  7. Coral: Oregon State University (http://www.flickr.com/photos/oregonstateuniversity/7008825923/sizes/o/in/photostream/
  8. Polar Bear:  Flickr Favorites (http://www.flickr.com/photos/38485387@N02
  9. Map: Wendy Foden et al (http://www.ploscollections.org/article/info%3Adoi%2F10.1371%2Fjournal.pone.0065427)

 

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