Author: Darcy Gill

This week in PLoS Medicine: Adult obesity; Assessing child development; Breast cancer; and more!

Read the new papers published in PLoS Medicine this week, including five Research Articles: The first genotyped children from the ALSPAC birth cohort and shows an association between greater early infancy gains in weight and length, and genetic markers for adult obesity risk. The second evaluates the reliability and validity of an assessment tool for evaluating child development in rural African settings. The third analyzes a case-control study among Afghan refugees in Pakistan and finds that a G6PD (glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase) “Mediterranean” type deficiency confers substantial protection against Plasmodium vivax malaria. The fourth evaluates the association between blood sugar levels and risk of coronary heart disease in people who do not have diabetes. And the fifth evaluates the prognostic significance of immunohistochemical subtype classification in more than 10,000 breast cancer cases with early disease, and examines the influence of a patient’s survival time on the prediction of future survival. The fifth Research Article is also discussed in a related Perspective.

Also published this week, is the May Editorial in which the PLoS Medicine editors ask whether journal publishing is an efficient enough mechanism for information sharing in the wake of the SARS epidemic and the H1N1 pandemic as well as a Research in Translation piece that discusses the epidemiology and care of adolescents undertaking nonsuicidal self-injury, also called “deliberate self-harm.”

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This week in PLoS Medicine: NTDs; H1N1 in Vietnam; Suicide risk for seniors

Read the new papers published in PLoS Medicine this week, including a Research Article that analyzes the initial outbreak, attempts at containment, and establishment of community transmission of pandemic H1N1 influenza in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam and a Policy Forum that discusses the suicide risk and opportunities for suicide prevention in seniors’ residential communities.

Also published this week, is a PLoS Medicine Debate that examines the different approaches that can be taken to tackle neglected tropical diseases (NTDs). Some commentators, such as Jerry Spiegel and colleagues from the University of British Columbia, feel there has been too much focus on the biomedical mechanisms and drug development for NTDs, at the expense of attention to the social determinants of disease. Burton Singer argues that this approach represents another example of the inappropriate “overmedicalization” of contemporary tropical disease control. Peter Hotez and colleagues, in contrast, argue that the best return on investment will continue to be mass drug administration for NTDs.

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This week in PLoS Medicine: Long term studies of chronic disease; Foreign policy and global health

Read the new papers published in PLoS Medicine this week, including a Policy Forum that argues there is an urgent need for longitudinal cohorts based in sub-Saharan Africa to address the growing burden of noncommunicable diseases in the region.

Also published this week, two Perspectives that conclude the PLoS Medicine series on Global Health Diplomacy: The first provides a perspective from the United States Department of State on current complexities and challenges in global health diplomacy and the second provides an international diplomatic perspective, describing how foreign policy can make a difference to global health challenges and focusing on the work of the WHO and the UN General Assembly.

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Ask PLoS Medicine: Can I republish a figure from another journal in PLoS Medicine?

If the figure is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (CCAL), then an author does not need to obtain permission to republish it in PLoS Medicine. When the paper that contains the figure in question is nearing acceptance, we’ll just request the author confirm that the figure is indeed available under CCAL and that’ll be it.

If the figure is not licensed under the CCAL, then the author needs to request permission from the copyright holder to republish it in PLoS Medicine. To do this, an author must make the copyright holder of the figure aware of the following three points:

  1. All PLoS Medicine content is published under the CCAL.
  2. Under the CCAL, authors retain ownership of the copyright for their articles, figures, tables, etc, but allow anyone to download, reuse, reprint, modify, distribute, and/or copy this content as long as the original authors and source are cited.
  3. Even though PLoS Medicine is a non-profit, under the CCAL, PLoS Medicine content can be reused for profit without permission.

After these points have been relayed, the author must provide us with an email from the copyright holder that reads:

I, [copyright owner’s name], give [corresponding author’s name] permission to republish [name of figure (i.e. Figure 1)], taken from [source 1="title" 2="of" 3="paper," 4="website," 5="etc)" language="(i.e."][/source], in PLoS Medicine under the Creative Commons Attribution License.

The copyright holder does not need to type up the above statement them self. The author can do this and send it to the copyright holder asking them to agree. This correspondence can then be provided to PLoS Medicine as proof of permission to republish.

If you have any questions regarding republishing figures, please ask them by commenting on this blog post and we’ll get back to you with the answer.

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This week in PLoS Medicine: SARS, HPV, and Influenza

Read the new papers published in PLoS Medicine this week, including a Research Article that reviewed the published epidemiological literature on SARS and shows that less than a quarter of papers were published during the epidemic itself, suggesting that the research published lagged substantially behind the need for it, and a second Research Article that identifies the parental factors associated with HPV vaccine uptake in a school-based program in Canada based on the analysis of a phone survey.

Also published this week, is a Policy Forum – from PLoS Medicine’s series on Global Health Diplomacy – that provides a case study of the difficult negotiations to increase equitable access to vaccines for highly pathogenic avian influenza A (H5N1) and pandemic 2009 influenza A (H1N1).

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This week in PLoS Medicine: Comparative effectiveness research; and more!

Read the new papers published in PLoS Medicine this week, including the April Editorial in which the PLoS Medicine Editors join with editors from other medical journals to lay out principles and standards for comparative effectiveness research (CER) and a Research Article that examines the distribution of obesity, diabetes, and other cardiovascular risk factors among urban migrant factory workers in India, together with their rural siblings.

Also published this week, is a Policy Forum – from PLoS Medicine’s series on Global Health Diplomacy – that provides a case study of China’s growing engagement in global health diplomacy following the SARS epidemic.

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This week in PLoS Medicine: Does foreign policy help or hinder global health?; and more!

Read the new papers published in PLoS Medicine this week, including three Research Articles. The first article finds that better family planning, provision of safe abortion, and improved intrapartum and emergency obstetrical care could reduce maternal mortality in India by 75% in 5 years, the second article systematically reviews studies on neoadjuvant therapy and tumor response, toxicity, resection, and survival percentages in pancreatic cancer and suggests that patients with locally nonresectable tumors should be included in neoadjuvant protocols, and the third article reports the results of a cross-sectional study examining ethnic differences in precursors of type 2 diabetes among children aged 9-10 living in three UK cities.

Also this week, PLoS Medicine launches a series on Global Health Diplomacy with a Policy Forum that considers the important interplay between foreign policy and global health interests, and introduces the series, and a second Policy Forum that provides a case study of Brazil’s growing influence in international relations and global health, using as an example the country’s role and use of soft power in the negotiation of the Framework Convention on Tobacco Control.

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Ask PLoS Medicine: I don’t have the funds to pay the publication fee. How can I receive a waiver or a discount?

Read about PLOS publication fees/discounts/waivers

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This week in PLoS Medicine: Improving data collection and estimation methods for mortality

Read the new papers published in PLoS Medicine this week, including three Research Articles and a Perspective that highlight the importance of gathering accurate information on numbers of deaths, and suggest ways of improving estimates in countries where complete vital registration systems do not exist.

The first paper evaluates the performance of a set of demographic methods estimating the fraction of deaths registered and counted by civil registration systems, and identifies three variants that generally perform the best, the second paper uses data from 166 demographic and health surveys to develop and validate new empirically based methods of estimating under-five mortality, and the third paper describes a novel method, the Corrected Sibling Survival method, that measures adult mortality in countries without good vital registration by use of histories taken from surviving siblings.

The related Perspective discusses these three research articles that address the measurement and analysis of child and adult mortality data collected through death registration, censuses, and household surveys.

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This week in PLoS Medicine: Decreasing newborn death; H1N1; and more!

Read the new papers published in PLoS Medicine this week, including two Research Articles: The first finds an association between prior seasonal flu vaccination and increased risk of 2009 pandemic H1N1 flu and is discussed in a related Perspective. The second assesses the cost-effectiveness of the program that provides free seasonal influenza vaccines to the entire population of Ontario, Canada.

Also published this week, a Health in Action piece that discusses a network that aims to improve infectious disease management through integrated, collaborative clinical research in South East Asia and a Policy Forum that discusses the critical importance of reducing global neonatal mortality in developing countries and how community-based approaches can help.

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