This Week in PLOS Medicine: Cost-effective PrEP; Atypical antipsychotics; Electronic patient records; Ethics in participant-led research

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Four new articles published this week in PLOS Medicine:

Gabriela Gomez and colleagues systematically review cost-effectiveness modeling studies of Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis (PrEP) for preventing HIV transmission and identify the main considerations to address when considering the introduction of PrEP to HIV prevention programs.

In a systematic review and meta-analysis, Glen Spielmans and colleagues find that adjunctive atypical antipsychotic medications are associated with small-to-moderate improvements in depressive symptoms in patients with depression, but there is little evidence for improvement on measures of quality of life and these medications are linked to adverse events such as weight gain.

Miguel Sanjoaquin and colleagues describe their experience of setting up an electronic patient records system in a large referral hospital in Blantyre, Malawi.

As participant-led health research increases, Effy Vayena and and John Tasioulas examine what ethical questions are raised, and what types of standards need to be developed for appropriate ethical oversight for participant-led research projects.

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