About Sci-Ed

Cristina Russo is a science writer with a Ph.D. in molecular biophysics. As a researcher, Dr. Russo has worked in designing drugs for cardiovascular disease and cancer. She currently writes about careers in STEM for Owen Software. Her passion for science outreach and education is reflected in her blog Dogs on Ice and in her volunteering service at the Smithsonian Natural History Museum and National Zoo. Cristina was born and raised in Brazil in a science-aficionado family. She later moved to the U.S. for Ph.D. training at Florida State University and Postdoctoral work at University of Washington. She has been awarded as creative and up-and-coming researcher in both countries. On twitter @russo_cristina and follow her blog. Views are her own and do not represent those of her employers.

 

Atif Kukaswadia is a Ph.D. candidate in Community Health and Epidemiology. Growing up, Atif was always fascinated by the world around him, and in particular in how our social environment shapes our lives and our personalities. While his current research looks at the health of Canadian youth, he is heavily involved in science outreach. You can connect with him on twitter @MrEpid or at  www.MrEpidemiology.com.

 

John Romano John Romano’s passion and fascination with the natural world would guide him through the rest of his life.  He began as a young boy, curating an extensive collection of frogs, snakes, turtles, bugs, worms, and plants. Later,  John studied evolutionary biology at the University of Maryland and then took a research position on Komodo Dragons with the Smithsonian Institute, where he contributed a chapter to a published work on the ancient reptiles. Wanting to share his passion on a larger scale John decided to become a high school science teacher so he could infect people with his love of animals on a daily basis.  He is currently the department head of science at Girard College where he continues spreading his love and passion for everything living. Views are his own and do not represent those of his employer. On twitter: @paleoromano.

 

 SCI-ED PAST CONTRIBUTORS

Adam Blankenbicker is an Education Specialist at the Smithsonian Institution National Museum of Natural History. Before entering informal science education, he earned his B.S. in Geology and Geological Oceanography with a Minor in Mathematics at the University of Rhode Island in 2004. In 2009 he completed his M.S. in Geology at Michigan Technological University in a program that allowed him to do research while serving in the United States Peace Corps in Guatemala, near the Santa Maria-Santiaguito volcano complex. After returning to the United States he continued his work in formal and informal education with the Massachusetts Audubon Society and the Museum of Science in Boston, MA. He is interested in active, participatory learning for all types of learners and what informal science education centers are doing to educate and engage the public in science.

Jean Flanagan lives in Washington, DC and is a Project Editor at the Smithsonian Science Education Center. Before that, she spent nearly 5 years at AAAS Project 2061, working as Research Associate in science education. Her main interests are in the development and evaluation of K-12 biology curriculum materials and assessments. Prior to embarking on a career in science education, she pursued research in marine ecology, lived on three different marine biological research stations, and received her B.S. in biology from Gettysburg College. Views expressed here are her own, and do not necessarily reflect those of her employer. Find her on Twitter at @jeancflanagan. Jean Flanagan is the original Sci-Ed creator and first project lead. 

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One Response to About Sci-Ed

  1. I teach in the marketplace through a 501c3 I helped start about 15 years ago. Attracting plenty of students independently of schools seems to verify high quality. If I wasn’t good, I wouldn’t have students to teach. I teach about 170 classes a year, mostly afterschool, at public and private elementary (mostly) schools in the Santa Cruz, CA, area. In the summer I have 5 weeks of field trips for grades ~ 2-7 and a week of Yosemite backpacking for grades ~ 6-9. What can I do to help others aspiring teachers? I’ve yet to find interest in good sci ed in school admin at any level. Some day I’ll retire and it’ll seem a waste to not share what I’ve learned in sci ed. Is there a local chapter or representative? Would it help to have one?

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