Stay Unique – PLOS introduces ORCID Identifiers

PLOS is pleased to announce the introduction of ORCID Identifiers to the people records in the manuscript submission system.

This update improves the accuracy of over 600,000 author and reviewer records. Matching researchers with their own work, and not that of someone else with the same or a similar name, is important because careers are built on these connections.

ORCID in PLOS Submission System

ORCID in PLOS submission system

After registering for an ORCID Identifier or inserting an existing one, Authors can build a professional profile by importing their work (articles, videos, conference abstracts) from the web or adding it manually.

Rebecca Bryant, Director of Community for ORCID said “ORCID is delighted to be working with PLOS.  Providing authors the opportunity to associate publications with their unique researcher identifier makes their work more discoverable and supports the open science goals of PLOS.”

Please update your EM information with an ORCID Identifier when submitting an article to PLOS.

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New data source added to PLOS ALM

We’re expanding the range of data sources in PLOS ALM to provide users with additional ways to evaluate the importance of research. F1000Prime recommendations now appear on 3000 highly influential PLOS articles (this number will grow as more articles are added).

Leading PLOS articles recommended by this new data source will feature the visual below, which includes a numerical score allocated to each review.

f1000-alm-tile

John Chodacki, Director of Product Management at PLOS said “Along with F1000Prime recommendations, researchers now have a diverse combination of metrics that more comprehensively evaluate the impact of an article.”

Increasing the range of PLOS ALM data sources helps tell a more complete story of how articles are used once they have been published – the F1000Prime metric is a new type in our suite, a qualitative recommendation, rather than a quantitative “share” or citation.

This valuable information can be shared with collaborators, institutions and funders to demonstrate the broader impact of research and helps guide readers to influential articles.

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PLOS journals sites win Interactive Media Award

As many of you will recall, in late 2012 all the PLOS journals were redesigned. Our updated sites, together with the web design agency, Digital Pulp, have been recognized with a Best in Class Award in the Interactive Media Awards (IMA) Nonprofit category.

IMA AwardTo qualify for an IMA, competing websites are scored on a 1- 100 scale using five specific criteria. Here’s a list of the different categories and our scores:

1. Content: 100
2. Feature Functionality: 99
3. Compliance & Compatibility: 95
4. Design: 94
5. Usability: 93

We’re delighted that our journals have achieved such a high standard of excellence in website design. We warmly congratulate Digital Pulp on their innovative approach to this project and thank all the PLOS staff involved for making this vision a reality.

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PLOS Journals now optimized for tablets

In December 2012 we redesigned all our journals, and although they’ve always worked on tablets, we’ve now tailored them to suit these devices as part of our continued roll-out of site enhancements to meet the needs of our community.

tablet-twoMany of the new site features we’ve introduced, such as more prominent figures and a figshare widget to visualize Supporting Information files, are ideally suited to the tablet’s touch interface. Improvements to content navigation are also supported by the addition of touch and swipe capability.

These tablet optimizations are just the beginning of our efforts to improve the mobile experience. Next we’ll be focusing on optimizing our journals for mobile phones. We will be replicating all the core features found on the main journal websites but enhancing them for use on the go. We’re currently working on features such as presenting content only when it is needed to improve loading speed on low bandwidth connections and simplifying the visual interface for small touch screens.

We’re proud to be self-funding these projects using revenue generated from our publishing business. It’s of prime importance for us as a non-profit that we give back to the researchers who publish with us and what better way to say thank you than with an improved tablet and mobile experience.

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Announcing ALM Reports – a new tool for analyzing Article Impact

PLOS is a leader in transforming research communication through Open Access and we are also committed to improving the evaluation of research through Article Level Metrics (ALM) that measure impact at the article (not the journal) level.

Today, we are delighted to announce the release of ALM Reports which allow you to view and download ALMs for any set of PLOS articles as well as summarize and visualize the data using charts that reveal patterns and trends for further discussion. Read more about the tech implementation of ALM Reports by Software Developer John Callaway on the PLOS Tech Blog.

To find ALM that interest you, simply enter as many of the following search terms as you wish into the ALM Reports tool: author info; institution; funder; subject areas; date range; journal title or provide the DOI (Digital Object Identifier) or PMID (PubMed ID). The resulting article list can be saved for future reference, instantly updated and shared on social media or email. We’ve also added some “best in class” categories of PLOS articles such as top cited and views, among others.

We invite the community to use this tool (which will eventually be added to journal search after further development) and consider how to integrate this new output into their research evaluation.

  • Funders and Institutions – examine the article impact of your people and projects
  • Researchers – filter which articles you should read first based on influence
  • Librarians – gain insight into which PLOS content is the most widely read and used

Tell us what you think – please share your thoughts and experiences of using this tool with us. We will use your feedback to help shape future iterations to better serve our community.

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Thank you

The 27 sponsors of the Accelerating Science Award Program (ASAP) would like to extend a heartfelt thank you to everyone who submitted a nomination for the award. The breadth of potential winners is truly inspiring as nominations were received from around the world, including individuals working in a host of different fields.  Their work demonstrates the creative and varied approaches to reusing research published in Open Access, and their impact illustrates the importance of ensuring that research be ‘open’ to the fullest extent possible to advance science and economic growth.

All qualified nominations are now being reviewed and will soon be submitted to our panel of experts for final evaluation. Nominees chosen as finalists will be notified in August. Candidates with the most compelling examples of applying scientific research — published through Open Access — to make a difference in science, medicine, business, technology or society as a whole will be honored as follows:

  •  ASAP bestows three top awards of $30,000 each.
  • A representative from each top award will receive a trip to Washington, DC in October 2013, where s/he will be honored at an Open Access Week kickoff event hosted by SPARC and the World Bank.
  • Honorable mention recipients will also be recognized on the ASAP website and in a portfolio book distributed online and in print around the world.

The winners of the three top awards will be announced on October 21 at 3pm EST through a live webcast of the OA Week Kickoff event.

Again, thank you for helping generate an enthusiastic response in support of ASAP. We are grateful to the many individuals and organizations for supporting the program and helping spread the word.  The availability of Open Access research is a tremendous benefit to society.  It enables all of us to have access to information that can make a difference in science, medicine, business, technology, or society as a whole.  For more information on the ASAP program, please visit asap.plos.org

 

 

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Nomination Deadline is June 15 (12:00am PST)—The Accelerating Science Award Program

There is less than a week for ASAP program award nominations.  This is an opportunity to showcase significant examples of Open Access reuse and to bestow $30,000 to three winners who will be recognized in October at an Open Access Week kickoff event hosted by SPARC and the World Bank. The winners will be those individuals or teams that have used, applied or remixed scientific research – published through Open Accessto innovate and make a difference in science, medicine, business, technology or society as a whole. Anyone who meets the criteria is eligible — scientists, researchers, educators, social services professionals, technology leaders, entrepreneurs, policy makers, patient advocates, public health workers, librarians and students.

Here are some key aspects of the ASAP program:

  • Three top ASAP program awards of $30,000 each
  • Anyone can nominate, individuals can nominate themselves
  • Nominators are anonymous and blinded for the selection process
  • Judges include: Harold Varmus, Agnes Binagwaho, Helga Notwotny, Tim O’Reilly, and Hans Rosling
  • 27 Global sponsors including major sponsors: the Wellcome Trust, PLOS and Google

*For more information on the ASAP program, please visit asap.plos.org. See also the Program rules at http://asap.plos.org/nominate/rules/. Follow the ASAP Program on Twitter at #SciASAP.

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Nomination Deadline is Approaching—The Accelerating Science Award Program

There is less than two weeks for ASAP program award nominations.  This is an opportunity to showcase significant examples of Open Access reuse and to bestow $30,000 to three winners who will be recognized at an Open Access Week kickoff event hosted by SPARC and the World Bank. The winners will be those individuals or teams that have used, applied or remixed scientific research – published through Open Accessto innovate and make a difference in science, medicine, business, technology or society as a whole. Anyone who meets the criteria is eligible — scientists, researchers, educators, social services professionals, technology leaders, entrepreneurs, policy makers, patient advocates, public health workers, librarians and students.

Here are some key aspects of the ASAP program:

  • Three top ASAP program awards of $30,000 each
  • Anyone can nominate, individuals can nominate themselves
  • Nominators are anonymous and blinded for the selection process
  • June 15, 2013 deadline
  • A simple online form located at the ASAP website: http://asap.plos.org
  • Judges include: Harold Varmus, Agnes Binagwaho, Helga Notwotny, Tim O’Reilly, and Hans Rosling
  • 27 Global sponsors including major sponsors: the Wellcome Trust, PLOS and Google

Here are some examples of potential nominations (please note that these are for illustrative purposes only and not meant to represent any actual researcher, innovative use, individual, or organization, and they do not cover all the potential innovative use cases)

  • The health minister of a low income country was able to confidently and      quickly change cancer treatment protocols based on an oncology research      article detailing successful uses of a repurposed cancer drug published by a peer reviewed, Open Access journal, which had been translated into multiple languages by a group of retired language teachers.
  • A bioinformatics team repurposes existing source codes used for searching genomic data associated with individual cancer tumors to create a new open source algorithm and web tool that can search multiple tumor types simultaneously, enabling faster and more comprehensive searches by      oncologists for use in clinical treatment of cancer patients
  • A climate policy expert took original figures and examples from a recent Open Access climate change research paper —  correlating temperature increases with rises in ocean depth — and repurposed these findings in a policy-focused presentation at a conference of experts from 25 Asian and Oceanic countries – leading to the adoption of stricter emissions standards by several participating countries.
  •  A patient advocate creates a new web community for individuals with a rare genetic disorder and their families; this website curates existing and newly available open access research about causes and treatment protocols, and offers interpretative science articles and a user forum to help nonscientist readers better understand the science presented

*For more information on the ASAP program, please visit asap.plos.org. See also the Program rules at http://asap.plos.org/nominate/rules/. Follow the ASAP Program on Twitter at #SciASAP.

 

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California Open Access Legislation Clears Latest Hurdle

The House Assembly today passed the California Taxpayer Access to Publicly Funded Research Act (AB 609). The act is now set to be heard in the Senate later this summer. If you live in California and would like to reach out to your state senator to show your support for AB 609 click on SPARC’s legislative action center and follow the prompts. If AB 609 becomes law, it will unlock access to the results of more than $200 million in annual, state-funded scientific research. We’d like to thank everyone who contacted their legislator to show support for this bill.

Meanwhile Open Access momentum continues in other states. The New York Open Access bill, S.4050 (Taxpayer Access to Publicly Funded Research) will be considered by the Senate Finance committee next week. PLOS will continue to follow these developments and keep you updated.

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Call to Action—Support Publicly Funded Research in California

The California Taxpayer Access to Publicly Funded Research Act (AB 609) is scheduled for a vote as early as tomorrow and we need your help to ensure its passage.

Last Friday the proposed legislation passed the California Assembly’s Appropriations Committee with full bipartisan support.  If AB 609 becomes law, it will unlock access to the results of more than $200 million in annual, state-funded scientific research.  You can help by contacting your Assembly Member now and voicing your concern that publicly funded research must be made publicly accessible.

Our friends at SPARC have made it easy for you to get involved. If you are based in California, contact your state legislators through their legislative action center, and encourage your friends and colleagues to do the same. If you are based outside of California, please share this call to action with any friends or colleagues who are based in the state.

PLOS welcomes your support. Let’s unlock access together.

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