Forks vs Feet Video and Podcast

Drs Bob Ross & Yoni Freedhoff Celebrating After the Debate

As many of our readers will know, last month the Canadian Obesity Network Student and New Professionals organization at the University of Ottawa hosted an event titled “Forks vs Feet“, which had Dr Bob Ross and Dr Yoni Freedhoff debating the relative importance of diet and exercise for weight loss and weight maintenance.  The event was (in our opinion) a huge success – the debate itself was highly entertaining and informative, and has also reached a much larger audience than we had hoped for. Roughly 150 people attended the debate in person, another 80 watched live online, and more than 600 others have viewed the video online since the event itself.  The debate was even mentioned in yesterday’s Globe and Mail, one of Canada’s most-read newspapers.

Today we have the high def video of that debate which was recorded by our friend and colleague Adrian Ebsary from Peer Review Radio, as well as a podcast of the audio (email subscribers can see both at visiting the blog)..  The debate lasted over an hour, so Adrian has split the video into three sections – Exercise, Diet, and Questions/Final Statements.

Our friend Colby Vorland of Nutritional Blogma has painstakingly found every single reference discussed by Drs Ross and Freedhoff during their debate (nicely done, Colby!).  The full list can be found here and I have also pasted the list below the fold at the bottom of this post. 

Dr. Robert Ross Argues for Exercise – Obesity Debate May 2011 – 1 of 2 from Adrian J. Ebsary on Vimeo.

Dr. Yoni Freedhoff Argues for Nutrition – Obesity Debate May 2011 – 2 of 2 from Adrian J. Ebsary on Vimeo.

Concluding Statements and Questions – Obesity Debate May 2011 from Adrian J. Ebsary on Vimeo.

A reminder that email subscribers can listen to the podcast here on the blog, and can also download it directly by clicking here (it’s released with a creative commons license, so feel free to embed or sample it on other sites however you please). And to have all of our podcasts delivered directly to your ipod, you can also subscribe via itunes. To view all of our former podcasts, click here.

Thanks once again to everyone who helped organize and promote the debate here in Ottawa and online, to Adrian for the fantastic video (and for figuring out a way to get such a massive video file online!) and of course to our fantastic debaters and moderator.

We are working on another obesity-related debate for next year that we hope will also appeal to both researchers and the general public alike.  More details to come as we find out about our funding situation.

Travis

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[From Colby Vorland of Nutritional Blogma]:

It is difficult to see their references in the videos but I tracked them down and pulled them for convenience:

From Dr. Ross’ Presentation:

From Dr. Freedhoff’s Presentation:

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Forks vs Feet Video and Podcast by Obesity Panacea, unless otherwise expressly stated, is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported License.

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One Response to Forks vs Feet Video and Podcast

  1. Fred Hahn says:

    The comparison and conclusions Dr. Ross makes between the decrease in moderate occupational activity and the increase in body weight in both men and women is completely bogus. You can’t make comparisons like this and draw any conclusions whatsoever unless every single other factor in people’s lives remains exactly the same and that of course is ridiculous.

    The NHANES data also shows and similar increase in the amount of total carbohydrate men and women have eaten over the past few decades.

    And since there are lean, sedentary people and obese active people, how in the world can physical activity have anything at all to do with causing or curing obesity?

    If increased TV viewing time is associated with obesity (associated mind you not caused by), how about increased reading or chess playing or crossword puzzles or….His boas is just too obvious. In fact, his statement that diet has nothing to do with obesity proves this.

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