Impending Flood? Hold Onto Your Family!

antsWith the extreme weather we’ve witnessed all over the US this winter, some people may be planning new ways to stay safe in the event of a natural disaster. If we can’t learn to predict these extreme events (as some animals may be able to) we may take a moment to learn from some often overlooked creatures, in this case, Formica selysi ants.

A group of researchers in Switzerland studied this species of ants’ technique for surviving a flooding event. They found that these ants, which regularly inhabit flood plains in the Alps and the Pyrenees, are well-prepared and ready to act in the event of impending submersion. The ants quickly form a “collective structure” by physically grasping on to one another to create a floating platform and raft to safety when a flood comes. This technique keeps nest-mates together, protects the queen, and ensures the survival of the majority of the colony.

Predictably, the researchers observed  that the ants place their queen towards the center of the rafts, in the most protected position. However, instead of likewise protecting their young, the worker ants use the buoyant properties of the brood by placing them at the bottom of the raft where they act as floatation devices. The young suffer little or no mortality from this placement and serve as vital support for the rest of the colony when incorporated into the raft in this fashion. Check out the ants in action in the video below (and on our Youtube channel).

Although we may not be able to literally grab onto each other and float above the water when threatened with a flood, the principle is what might be important. Lesson learned: be prepared and gather your family and friends close to tackle whatever challenge is approaching together.

 

Citation: Purcell J, Avril A, Jaffuel G, Bates S, Chapuisat M (2014) Ant Brood Function as Life Preservers during Floods. PLoS ONE 9(2): e89211. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0089211

Image: Figure 1 from doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0089211

 

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