This Week in PLOS Medicine: HIV testing methods; Rotavirus vaccines; Medical devices in LMICs & more

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Image Credit: NIADDK, 9AO4 (Connie Raab-contact); NIH

Four new articles published this week in PLOS Medicine, ranging from global burdens to public health studies and the Internet.

A study carried out by Carla Obermeyer and colleagues examines whether practices regarding consent, confidentiality, and referral vary depending on whether HIV testing is provided through voluntary counseling and testing or provider-initiated testing.

A modeling analysis conducted by Manish Patel and colleagues predicts the possible number of rotavirus deaths prevented, and number of intussusception deaths caused, by use of an unrestricted rotavirus schedule in low- and middle-income countries.

Charles Preston and colleagues use case studies to describe how regulatory systems for medical products and medicines must be strengthened in low- and middle-income countries to assure adequate quality, safety, and efficacy.

An Essay by A. Cecile Janssens and Peter Kraft discusses the limitations inherent in research involving collection of self-reported data by self-selected participants, and makes proposals for upfront communication of such limitations to study participants.

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