Neville Owen Explains The Science of Sedentary Behaviour

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Today I am excited to have 2 videos featuring sedentary behaviour researcher Neville Owen, which were recorded earlier this month by Sedentary Behaviour Research Network member Ernesto Ramirez.

Neville’s name will be familiar to regular readers of the blog.  He is one of the world’s foremost researchers of sedentary behaviour, and has published seminal studies linking sedentary behaviour with increased risk of mortality, and highlighting the importance of breaks in sedentary behaviour.  Along with Mark Tremblay, Rachel Colley, and Genevieve Healy, I was fortunate to co-author a review paper on the health impact of sedentary behaviour with Neville last December (available here).  For more on that review paper, feel free to check out this 4-part series of posts breaking it down.

Last week Dr Owen spoke with researchers at the University of California, San Diego (UCSD), and was kind enough to allow Ernesto  to record and publish two videos of his talk, which are embedded below.  In the first video, you can see Dr Owen explain what sedentary behaviour is, how an “active” person can still accumulate lots of sedentary time, and the impact of interventions aimed at reducing sedentary time.  In the second video, Dr Owen takes questions from the audience on the impact of sedentary behaviour in kids, how we can change the work environment to allow people to reduce their sedentary behaviour, and gives his thoughts on standing desks.

Thanks to Dr Owen for allowing his talk to be recorded and thanks to Ernesto Ramirez for the excellent recording.  For more info on sedentary behaviour, or to join the Sedentary Behaviour Research Network (membership is free!), or to access the ever-expanding database of sedentary behaviour research (90 papers and counting), please visit sedentarybehaviour.org.
Travis
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