Preventing Obesity Part 2: Mental Work (Podcast # 20)

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Dr Angelo Tremblay

It’s time for part 2 in our series on obesity prevention with Universite Laval obesity researcher Angelo Tremblay (Part 1, which focused on the relationship between sleep and obesity, can be found here).

In today’s episode he discusses the important role that mental work and stress have on appetite, and therefore energy balance.  He also explains ways that we can reduce the impact of mental work on energy balance, either by reducing the amount of mental work that children must deal with on a daily basis (e.g. less class time) or increasing the amount of physical activity in our daily lives.  He also explains his strategy of “running meetings”, which got his lab featured in Runner’s World magazine.

As with last week, the presentation can be listened to as a typical audio-only podcast, or it can be viewed as a webinar with powerpoint slides.  This week’s presentation is just over 15 minutes.

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A reminder that email subscribers can listen to the podcast here on the blog, and can also download it directly by clicking here (it’s released with a creative commons license, so feel free to embed or sample it on other sites however you please). And to have all of our podcasts delivered directly to your ipod, you can also subscribe via itunes. To view all of our former podcasts, click here.

As always, we’d love to hear your thoughts and comments. Enjoy the podcast, and don’t forget to check-in for next week’s podcast on the impact of mental work on appetite and food intake!

Travis

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ResearchBlogging.orgCHAPUT, J., & TREMBLAY, A. (2007). Acute effects of knowledge-based work on feeding behavior and energy intake Physiology & Behavior, 90 (1), 66-72 DOI: 10.1016/j.physbeh.2006.08.030

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