Is DEA about to act of K2 Spice synthetic marijuana products?

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Since February of this year, we’ve been following the course of sale and local prohibition of products containing synthetic cannabimimetic compounds – “herbal incense” products that go by names like K2, Spice, Black Mamba and are sold in tobacco and head shops and convenience stores, as well as the pure compounds themselves – JWH-018, JWH-250 – available from internet retailers. (UPDATE: No sooner had I pressed “Publish” on this post than I saw a story at local WRAL-TV on young adults having unpleasant experiences with a K2 product.)

These products are no longer legal in Europe and it’s beginning to look like they are on their way out in the US. Currently 15 states have banned the products and the compounds therein. But the US Drug Enforcement Agency has been unusually silent on this issue publicly although they’ve been covering the trend as early as their March 2009 issue of their monthly Microgram publication. Microgram makes for great reading just to see how creative drug smugglers can be – however, I’m disappointed that the HTML version containing photographs of various products and tactics ended May 2009.

In any case, the following is a 5 1/2-minute interview with Ava Cooper Davis, Special Agent in Charge of the DEA Washington Division, on DC’s WTTG-TV last Thursday. This is the first DEA representative I’ve seen on television commenting publicly on their investigation of synthetic marijuana products.

At around 4:30 of the interview, Davis states:

“We are collecting intelligence. . .working with our state and local partners and, in addition to that, we’re conducting scientific evaluation to make the determination as to whether or not this needs to be scheduled.”

Source: MyFoxDC.com, WTTG-TV, Channel 5 – 21 October 2010

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